Monica’s new job and The Disabled Person and Work

Because of a confusion at Monica’s job, Monica has been temporarily unemployed. Sometimes it is difficult for a person with cognitive disability to distinguish nuanced situations. At her last job some of these nuances occurred. On some days she was asked to join the residents of her nursing home for coffee, but on another day, she poured herself a cup and was disciplined. On some days free food was brought in for celebrations, but on another day she was accused of stealing a soda that was left in the refrigerator. She would refer to her phone for the time, but then if it rang and she answered it, it was a violation. Some of these incidents festered and her parents had not heard about them. (They came to light in a later interview.) So Monica has been home for several weeks, taking a breather so to speak. During that time she has greatly lamented her infractions, to the extent she can understand them. She has cried and journaled, but mostly looked positively toward her next venture.

Today her venture began. Her employer has placed her in a new facility which is actually a little closer to home. She was incredibly excited all the past week telling her relatives and friends about her new placement. Mom and Monica went out and Monica bought a watch so that she no longer needs to look to her phone at work…her phone is being safely stored in her locker during time on the clock. A journal book was purchased and inaugurated so that her employer can note any issues that come up. Daily it will circuit between home and work with a brief comment by employer and parents. Monica understands (we think) that it is better if she just eats and drinks food stuffs that she brings from home, and she cannot serve herself anything at work that she has not brought. This is a little difficult, sometimes there are mini-celebrations and birthdays celebrated during break. We will need to keep developing her sensitivities in this area.

So, today at the evening dinner table Monica reviewed her notes of the day and told us with sparkly eyes and cherubic smile all that had happened at work, new friends, new instructions and duties, new work hours. How happy we were for her, to see her laugh and almost trip over her words in her excitement. Then later this evening I was reading and came across this quote from Pope John Paul II’s document on “Human Work” Laborem Exercens (Section 22 – The Disabled Person and Work). I teared up when I read this and was struck with gratitude for all the efforts made by the agencies and employers who have worked with Monica. Despite occasional stumbles, they are participating in achieving this difficult good.

Pope John Paul II wrote in 1981:

“Recently, national communities and international organizations have turned their attention to another question connected with work, one full of implications: the question of disabled people. They too are fully human subjects with corresponding innate, sacred and inviolable rights, and, in spite of the limitations and sufferings affecting their bodies and faculties, they point up more clearly the dignity and greatness of man. Since disabled people are subjects with all their rights, they should be helped to participate in the life of society in all its aspects and at all the levels accessible to their capacities. The disabled person is one of us and participates fully in the same humanity that we possess. It would be radically unworthy of man, and a denial of our common humanity, to admit to the life of the community, and thus admit to work, only those who are fully functional. To do so would be to practise a serious form of discrimination, that of the strong and healthy against the weak and sick. Work in the objective sense should be subordinated, in this circumstance too, to the dignity of man, to the subject of work and not to economic advantage.

The various bodies involved in the world of labour, both the direct and the indirect employer, should therefore by means of effective and appropriate measures foster the right of disabled people to professional training and work, so that they can be given a productive activity suited to them. Many practical problems arise at this point, as well as legal and economic ones; but the community, that is to say, the public authorities, associations and intermediate groups, business enterprises and the disabled themselves should pool their ideas and resources so as to attain this goal that must not be shirked: that disabled people may be offered work according to their capabilities, for this is demanded by their dignity as persons and as subjects of work. Each community will be able to set up suitable structures for finding or creating jobs for such people both in the usual public or private enterprises, by offering them ordinary or suitably adapted jobs, and in what are called “protected” enterprises and surroundings.

Careful attention must be devoted to the physical and psychological working conditions of disabled people-as for all workers-to their just remuneration, to the possibility of their promotion, and to the elimination of various obstacles. Without hiding the fact that this is a complex and difficult task, it is to be hoped that a correct concept of labour in the subjective sense will produce a situation which will make it possible for disabled people to feel that they are not cut off from the working world or dependent upon society, but that they are full-scale subjects of work, useful, respected for their human dignity and called to contribute to the progress and welfare of their families and of the community according to their particular capacities.”

2012 – Monica Age 20 – Transition: School to Work

Monica lived all the events of her senior year to the fullest. We were delighted to see her in cap and gown and carrying the bouquet of roses. She was a terrific hostess at her celebration. Her work at a Summer Internship through the County put her in a position to be ready when a job opened in the fall. She now puts herself 110% into her new job. She is on the cleaning crew at a county building: sweeping, mopping, cleaning tables and chairs in the cafeteria, etc. She is progressing well in her piano lessons and played a string of songs for us at this year’s caroling party. She also works one morning a week for a mom of six kids here in Fairview Park as a mother’s helper. Mary Ellen’s volunteering is in transition now with Monica’s schedule changes, so the two of them will be investigating involvements they can do together, of course looking forward to having more time with her sister and her nieces in the year ahead.

Grad_stage 2Grad_for_web 2

2011 – Monica Age 19 – Work at Hospital

Monica is delighting in her senior year of high school. She spends one-half day in the work program at Southwest General Hospital and one-half day at school. The SWGH work program has been especially encouraging for us because the program administrator has placed her in regular jobs (clearing trays in the cafeteria and laundering surgical towels) and in patient rooms (restocking supplies). Her job evaluations are very high and she so enjoys the work. This year Monica also began piano lessons. A professor at Baldwin Wallace University was intrigued by the challenge and has experimented with many teaching methods. We are thrilled with her progress, every day her singing and playing at the piano lifts our hearts. She will walk with her class at graduation in June!

Performing for family

Performing for family

2010 – Monica Age 18 – Work Experience, Piano

Fairview High School has approved Monica for the Community Work Experience program at Polaris Career Center. She is in a rotation of jobs at Southwest General Hospital learning many skills that will allow her to be employable by graduation if not sooner! She loves working and the staff love her. In the afternoon Monica returns to Fairview HS for classes. Her curriculum there is very practical and focuses on functional math and language skills. Maybe you have gotten a note from her? Monica corresponds more than anyone else in our family, remembering birthdays, events and concerns. She loves to go to daily mass with Tim and Greg and outpours cheerful enthusiasm. And she tickles the ivory! Every day she practices piano with an amazing self motivation. On Sundays, when we have family spiritual reading, she eagerly participates and focuses on speaking very clearly. Greg and Monica attend parish youth group meetings and events, with Greg keeping a watchful eye on her without getting in the way of her making her own friends.

A Fairview Friend

A Fairview Friend